Manfred Eigen Lecture: Circadian regulation, gene expression and the fly brain

Manfred Eigen Lecture

  • Date: Nov 26, 2019
  • Time: 14:00 - 15:00
  • Speaker: Prof. Dr. Michael Rosbash
  • Department of Biology, Brandeis University USA, Howard Hughes Medical Institute
  • Location: Max-Planck-Institut für biophysikalische Chemie (MPIBPC)
  • Room: Manfred Eigen Hall
  • Host: Dirk Görlich
  • Contact: helena.miletic@mpibpc.mpg.de
Manfred Eigen Lecture: Circadian regulation, gene expression and the fly brain
The mechanism and genes that underlies circadian timing are conserved in all animals, from fruit flies to humans, and include a conserved set of transcription-translation feedback loops. This system also governs a large fraction of all gene expression in many if not most tissues, which explains why so much animal physiology (biochemistry, metabolism, endocrinology, behavior, sleep, etc.) is under temporal control. A large fraction of my current research focuses on the Drosophila brain, where ~150 central brain “clock” neurons cells play a prominent role in orchestrating the fly sleep-wake cycle. These cells share the central clock timekeeping mechanism but are otherwise remarkably heterogeneous from a molecular profiling point of view. Neuronal heterogeneity may be a general feature of the tiny fly brain (100,000 neurons) and help explain how it can orchestrate such an impressive array of complex behaviors. Time permitting, I will also discuss an additional topic, one that bridges the identification of RNA-binding protein targets to issues of neuroscience interest.
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